Archive Monthly Archives: April 2011

Obama’s winning solution for America’s high gas prices

The question swirling around America right now is who to point the finger at for the quickly rising gas prices consumers are dealing with at the pump. The Obama Administration has chosen its usual course and announced at the end of last week that a new “task force” was looking into if Americans were being taken in by fraud at the pump.

During a brief town-hall style meeting Friday in Reno, Nev. sandwiched between campaign fundraising events on the west coast, Obama assured the public that his task force was looking into whether there were cases of fraud or manipulation with speculators and traders in the country who he claim could be “taking advantage of American consumers for their own short-term gains.”

President Obama is no stranger to quickly siding against the oil and gas industry when turmoil threatens his less-than popular position with Americans. With his 2012 campaign quickly approaching, he was quick to show the watching public that he is attempting to take action for the high gas prices, albeit in an absurd way.

I know I’m not the only one that finds it highly ridiculous that the president could even begin to rest his case for the nation’s near record-high gas prices on an investigation of possible fraud in the oil markets because of “traders and speculators,” when there are clearly other factors worldwide that are affecting the prices instead.

Three factors, just off the top of my head without actually researching it, seem to me to be much more likely culprits for our near $4 a gallon gas.

1. The crashing value of America’s dollar.

2. China and India’s demand for oil in their quickly growing and strengthening economies.

3. Concern over unrest in the Middle East and Africa.

The combination of these three clearly evident factors is enough to set the gas prices off on a fast climb. While I don’t doubt that the Big Oil companies such as Exxon, BP and the likes are making killing profits right now because of the high prices, I also don’t think they are the reason I’m putting $70-80 a week into my crossover at my local Marathon station.

At least one thing is certain, thank God for President Obama and his task force. I can now rest easy knowing that they’ll get to the bottom of this murky wrong-doing in our domestic oil markets and I can be confident these high gas prices are not a result of illegal activity.

Does that make you feel any better as you fill up today?

Clients share their best tips for picking the best oil and gas software

If you’ve ever looked for oil and gas accounting software or are in the process right now, you know it can be a long, stressful and drawn out process trying to make the best decision to help propel your company into an easier future. I’ve written previous posts on 10 steps to picking the best oil and gas software and 9 mistakes to avoid, but today I wanted to tap into the expertise of our large client base to get their real-life advice for how they went about deciding on their oil and gas accounting software.

In addition to providing tips for picking the best software, our clients also affirmed the steps I outlined in the previous post on picking the best oil and gas accounting software and the majority of clients said they compared one to three other software products before making their decision.

Their responses fell into eight categories of tips. I hope you find them helpful as you search for your best oil and gas accounting package for your own business.

1. Research products well.

Look for what their program has to offer your specific needs

Look at the different programs, if it is easy to understand and work with, if the price is right and they offer quick and helpful support, you probably will be looking at SherWare and I’d say go for it.

Keep it simple and purchase a software package that can handle all aspects of the oil and gas and gas business, i.e. land/leasing, AFEs, A/P, A/R, payroll and revenue distribution.

Research all of them and decide which would provide your company the most.

Buy what you need – not more or less. A large complicated system may require costly in-house support. Demo the package with your business situations.

Look for the software that will work best with your current software and needs.

Look at software you are comfortable working with. For me, I am very comfortable with QuickBooks, and then the price. We are a very small company and the other software we looked at was very pricey.

Ask questions, get references and spend the time to set up your system and accounts right.

Don’t discount an economically priced package without a proper evaluation.

Please look into every aspect of the software to make sure it meets all of your needs. Meet with the owner/personnel of the software you are looking at to get a demo or answer any questions you might have.

Make sure you analyze your needs and ask specific questions as to the performance of the software to be sure that it fits your needs.

2. Consider the accounting side you want to use.

If you are using QuickBooks, there is no other choice and I definitely would not consider changing from QuickBooks.

I would never select a software that didn’t integrate with QuickBooks. It saves so much time and everything balances, every month!

The interlink between QuickBooks and SherWare gives one all you ever need to “do it all.” Roughneck, Wolfepak, Solomon, etc. are all priced too high for the smaller producer/operator. Even if you’re a big time Charlie, SherWare and QuickBooks is great value for your money.

3. Select software that’s easy to use.

Select user friendly software.

Get something easy to use, but that doesn’t need updates and fixes very often.

Pick a product that you can use easily and still get all the info you need.

Choose the simplest program that will get your job done with minimal effort.

Make sure it offers all the services you need and that it is not over complicated to operate.

Look for easy to use functions at an affordable price.

4. Determine how the transition between programs will go.

Try to anticipate and minimize the difficulty of the transition from the old system.

5. Look to the future and make sure the software can adapt and grow as your company does.

Look at ease of use and ability to customize. Ask the developer does the software have the ability to grow and adapt to the ever-changing industry. Regulations changes are going to continue to come.

Look at what you need for your company, then look at the features of the software. Does it meet your needs and leave room for growing?

Pick a software program you can grow with.

6. Talk with references and current clients.

Talk to people who already use the software to see the pros and cons.

7. Test the software products before making final decisions.

Take your time and test as many of the reports as possible before choosing.

Try it out and then compare it to other software as to price and ease of use.

Get someone from the software company to run through a demo version of the software so you can ask questions.

8. Look at well you like the staff and support of the company itself.

Look for a company willing to stay with you long after you purchased their product. The more user-friendly, the better. If software staff is impatient and/or talks down to you, I suggest you look at other packages.

The software company’s employees’ knowledge of the oil and gas industry should be key in deciding whether to purchase their product.

Support is a huge part of purchasing software. SherWare is always there to help when I need them and friendly about it.

Choose a company that has good resources to continue support.

Do you have any other tips that we should add to this list for your own experience?

Turning accidents into success: SherWare’s unlikely start

It started quite by accident, the way many things do when a person stumbles upon something greater than they realize. SherWare was a fleeting idea; a project intended to pay bills, the name ill-conceived at the time.

Phil Sherwood was a computer consultant who was new to the area and just starting to build a client base through direct mailings and word-of-mouth. With no oil and gas experience, it was through chance, and through his office suite mate, Butch Rogers, an oil and gas CPA, that he was introduced to a pair of clients needing consulting work for their oil and gas businesses.

As a teenager, Phil wanted to be a neurosurgeon, an interest largely influenced by his father’s tragic fall from the roof of their home when he was 15, and subsequent brain injury and death. He volunteered at the local hospital as an aide in high school and began the first several years of college taking courses in pre-med and psychology, staying on track with his dream to help others the way doctors couldn’t with his dad.

Changing courses

One credit hour of a computer class was required for those with a psychology major, so as a sophomore, Phil begrudgingly trekked into the first class wondering why on earth a psychology major would need to take a computer course. That’s all it took though, for by the end of the semester Phil had fallen in love and found himself switching majors to computer science.

Surprisingly, the switch from wanting to be a neurosurgeon to a computer programmer wasn’t as hard as he thought.

“Computers grabbed me and I didn’t look back,” he said. “The classes were fun and challenging and it fit my personality.”

Phil started working as a computer programmer for Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, before he and his family moved north to Ohio where Phil began his own computer consulting business.

He had been consulting for various clients in the Wooster, Ohio, area for about a year, when he met the two oil and gas clients of his suite mate Rogers who would change the course of his business in a few short months.

“They had originally hired me to do consulting work for them to help find a way to get their oil and gas operations data into QuickBooks for accounting purposes,” Phil said. “When they found out that I could write software, they asked if I could please write something simple for them to use.”

That was in the early 1990s before the Internet changed the way the world works and sites like Wikipedia and Amazon.com changed the way the word learns. So unlike today, with no easy way to learn about the oil and gas business he was getting into, Phil began to ask a lot of questions, and take notes of how the industry worked.

“They described how they wanted it to work,” he said. “They described the oil and gas business and described how wells are drilled and how they produce and then how they have to pay royalty owner and investors based on production and also keep track of severance taxes and provide 1099s at the end of the year. They gave me an oil and gas 101 crash course to help me see exactly what their needs were in terms of oil and gas accounting software that was easy to use. At the time, everything was too hard to use, too expensive or didn’t have the features they really wanted to use.”

He met with the clients several times per week and with Rogers, the oil and gas CPA to get input into exactly how the accounting and revenue distribution features should work within the new program, still unnamed at this point.

It took about four or five months to get the first workable copy ready for the clients to be able to use, as he was still doing consulting in the area to pay the bills, as he didn’t know quite where this job would end up.

SherWare’s turning point

“When I first started on the SherWare program, I just envisioned getting paid for writing the software for them,” Phil said. “As I got in the middle of it though, I thought that maybe this could be something others would need too, so I would just give it to these two clients who helped build it and see about selling it to others like them.”

The year is 1994 and what’s now known as the Disbursement and JIB Manager software has just been created. Now the problem was what to call it.

“I was walking around the block one day thinking of what to call the company and I couldn’t think of anything,” he said. “I had thought of something generic like Cornerstone Software, but everything I thought of was already incorporated and someone else’s business name, so I took the first part of my last name and the last part of software and made SherWare.”

Looking back at the name choice, at the time it was an ill conceived name because it was so close to the word shareware which was very popular at the time, he said. Shareware is a term that means distributing software that you try it first and then pay if you want too, so SherWare got confused with it initially, making it harder to take off.

Looking forward

Today SherWare has grown exponentially and now has more than 600 clients across 28 states between the three oil and gas accounting software products the company now sells and supports. In the 17 years that have passed, not much has changed from the spirit of the company and how it first began. SherWare’s software is still a product that is created and continuously improved upon primarily based on client input and requests.

New products that will be released in the future include an Investment Manager software for investors to use to track their revenue and expenses incurred from the wells they’ve invested in, a Disbursement and JIB Manager Integrated Edition that works with QuickBooks Online software and online versions of SherWare’s oil and gas accounting software.

9 Mistakes People Make When Selecting Oil & Gas Software

Earlier I wrote 10 steps for choosing your oil and gas software. On a spin of that, I’d like to tell you nine mistakes to avoid when choosing what oil and gas software you need for your company.

1. They didn’t figure out beforehand what they wanted the software to do. This seems like a no-brainer mistake that you wouldn’t dream of doing yourself. Unfortunately, all too many companies make this mistake by not creating a specific list of what they want/need the software to do. selecting oil and gas softwareIt’s easy to get lured into the marketing hype of a product because it appears to easily solve the problem that is clearly causing you such grief. But buying a product without making sure it actually fits your business can end up causing you more headache than necessary.

2. They purchase a product based on price and not based on needs.You don’t need to tell me today how important cost is in the business equation today. I, too, read the news and understand how bleak the economy can appear. But in reality, the lowest price doesn’t always mean the best solution. Understanding your budget is an important part of the software-buying process. But being able to evaluate a product that can boost your bottom line without bankrupting you is equally important. Make sure that you don’t purchase solely because it’s the lowest or even highest price. Make sure you’re getting your money’s worth for what you need the product to do. Investments pay off in the future if they’re made wisely.

3. They didn’t get any one else’s opinion on the software. Of course software vendors are always going to think and tell you they are the best product available. That doesn’t mean you should jump in head first and purchase. Find out what other clients have to say about the staff, product and service. Get references from the company, read testimonials from real clients and talk to people in the industry to see what they think and have heard as well.

4. They don’t see (physically) how the software can work for their business. It’s important that you can visualize using the software in your office before making your decision. View the software with a trained representative, so you can see firsthand how the software works. You want to work with real person so you can ask questions and have them demonstrate scenarios that you’ll need on a day-to-day basis. Viewing a demonstration on your own time, in your office alone, will invariably lead to frustration and confusion without first having knowledge of how the software works.

5. They have too many people involved in the selection process. I’m sure you’ve heard the saying ‘Less is more,’ which is precisely the point with this common mistake. Companies often want to make sure everyone possible can be involved in choosing the best product. Too many people involved can end up causing the group to divide, and stall the decision between several products. Instead, select a smaller, targeted group of people from your company with a array of job duties who can come to a consensus.

6. They don’t let the software company talk with their employees.Perhaps it’s because you don’t want to give any company the upper hand in this evaluation process, or maybe you just don’t want them mingling with your company, either way, companies often keep software companies at an arm’s length away – which can really hurt the decision process.

Choosing a software vendor – like an oil and gas accounting software vendor, in our case, is comparable to getting married. You’re likely to be together for an extended amount of time for better or worse, so you want to build a relationship with them first, before jumping headlong into a commitment. Let the software company ask you questions and get an idea of how your business runs. This will help them understand how to help you better, get to know how they work as a company and show any red flags beforehand if something can’t be addressed the way you need it to, or if you don’t get along.

7. They only focus on the basic principles of the software. Don’t spend all your time evaluating standard features such as how the accounting works, how owners, wells and leases are handled, etc. You should be able to assume that any reasonable system can handle the standard functions of oil and gas accounting and distribution if that is what the foundation is built upon. Instead, focus on the processes that you will need to differentiate your business and things specific to how you operate. Find out how the software would solve that problem, or task, etc.

8. They forget to consider how things will work as their business grows and expands. The software product you’re deciding on might look nice and pretty at this moment, but you also want a product that is flexible and can grow with you and handle your needs. Make sure the product won’t just grow in the future – but is one that can already handle needs and companies as large as you hope to become one day.

9. Set a definite timeline for when you want to select new software.By not making the software evaluation process a formal affair, too much time ends up being wasted by not having a deadline set for when you want to make a decision. With a goal to work towards and an end in sight, you can save time money and avoid dissatisfaction, confusion and making a hasty decision that you’ll regret, whether you choose to purchase the product or not.

Nine Mistakes People Make When Selecting Oil & Gas Software – Part 2

Ever had one of those moments when your brain entirely shuts down and you forget something really important you were supposed to do or say or where you were supposed to be? I confess, I have those often. This post is a reminder. You’ll notice from the title that it is Part 2 of a series. The unfortunate brain part comes in when you find out that Part 1 was posted in August last year….and I just discovered this week that I forgot to post part 2, oh say, eight months ago.

Here’s to one of those days you’ll find funny in a few weeks, but right now it’s just a little painful to think about. 🙂 You can refresh yourself with the first five mistakes to avoid when choosing oil and gas software.

6. They don’t let the software company talk with their employees. Perhaps it’s because you don’t want to give any company the upper hand in this evaluation process, or maybe you just don’t want them mingling with your company, either way, companies often keep software companies at an arm’s length away – which can really hurt the decision process.

Choosing a software vendor – like an oil and gas accounting software vendor, in our case, is comparable to getting married. You’re likely to be together for an extended amount of time for better or worse, so you want to build a relationship with them first, before jumping headlong into a commitment. Let the software company ask you questions and get an idea of how your business runs. This will help them understand how to help you better, get to know how they work as a company and show any red flags beforehand if something can’t be addressed the way you need it to, or if you don’t get along.

7. They only focus on the basic principles of the software. Don’t spend all your time evaluating standard features such as how the accounting works, how owners, wells and leases are handled, etc. You should be able to assume that any reasonable system can handle the standard functions of oil and gas accounting and distribution if that is what the foundation is built upon. Instead, focus on the processes that you will need to differentiate your business and things specific to how you operate. Find out how the software would solve that problem, or task, etc.

8. They forget to consider how things will work as their business grows and expands. The software product you’re deciding on might look nice and pretty at this moment, but you also want a product that is flexible and can grow with you and handle your needs. Make sure the product won’t just grow in the future – but is one that can already handle needs and companies as large as you hope to become one day.

9. Set a definite timeline for when you want to select new software. By not making the software evaluation process a formal affair, too much time ends up being wasted by not having a deadline set for when you want to make a decision. With a goal to work towards and an end in sight, you can save time money and avoid dissatisfaction, confusion and making a hasty decision that you’ll regret, whether you choose to purchase the product or not.

Why invest in an oil and gas accounting program?

We can all think of reasons why NOT to buy a product, and oil and gas accounting software is no different. Sometimes it’s about price, timing, fear of having to switch to a new program, fear of not liking the program after all. What about all the reasons why you should invest in an oil and gas accounting program?

I posed this question for our clients over the last few weeks wanting to find out what the driving forces are for actually purchasing a program – and not necessarily just SherWare’s software – any oil and gas accounting program. Here are their responses:

Why should a company invest in an oil and gas accounting program?

1. An oil and gas accounting program is “absolutely necessary.” – Dan Kosikowski

2. “A well organized oil and gas accounting program will keep your records up to date and help make quick decisions on a variety of business transactions affecting your oil and gas operations.” – Tammy Wheeler

3. An oil and gas accounting program makes it easier to keep up with all your billing and expenses:

“To assist with AFEs and distribution of revenue” – Diane Osborn

“To handle doing royalties along with tracing each individual well’s costs” – Lori Maez

“To have better controls over revenue and JIBs and invoice verification” – Monte Lang

“To make sure all expenses and revenue are accurately accounted for. It is very easy to miscalculate distributions of expenses and revenue or over look billing out expenses.” – Renee Clark

“It makes the whole process of accounting and distribution easier and more accurate.” – Lorey Forrer

“A company should invest in an oil and gas accounting program because it not only makes JIB billing easier, it also allows faster input of production receipts and bills.” – Amy Montayne

4. An oil and gas accounting program “eases the stress and work of properly accounting for revenues and expenses on mineral producing properties.” – Anne Calvin

5. “Trying to manually account for oil and gas interests is very difficult when there are a significant number of wells involved. Even with a few operated wells, when there are a significant number of working interest or royalty interest owners, it also becomes difficult, especially when personnel resources are limited.” – Dan Neale

6. An oil and gas accounting program is “more accurate and faster than doing it by hand or spreadsheets, and it’s easier to check on past issues.” – Carol Watkins

“Excel spreadsheets are also too bothersome.” – James Phillips

7. “Oil and Gas management is a unique business you can’t explain to the general person. My first accountant screwed up so much the IRS felt sorry for me. … It’s nice to be able to find information and compare lease profits and do the book in a 10th of the time.” – Darwin Allen

8. An oil and gas accounting program is “cheaper than outsourcing and it allows you to track expenses and production, as well as AFEs. It integrates perfectly with QuickBooks, so from that perspective there is little or no extra training on the accounting side.” – Victoria Allen

9. An oil and gas accounting program allows you to “streamline and better handle the disbursement process, making allocations and disbursements SO MUCH easier.” – Bruce Brocker & Cynthia Moore

10. “Non oil and gas accounting packages are not designed to handle the unique processes of joint interest billing, revenue distribution, tracking LOE, suspense accounting, etc. While non oil and gas accounting packages could be used, extensive customization would most likely be required making support of your system much more difficult for the provider to provide. In addition, the processes might be much more time consuming and convoluted with a customized package.” – Teri Braun

11. “There are two main reasons: to streamline the distribution process and be in compliance with state tax reporting” – Kara Brooks

12. An oil and gas accounting program saves time.

“Saves time and money on accounting, and leaves more time for real job which should be generating drilling prospects.” – Rod Phares

“Definitely a time saving device. Don’t think you should be without such a program if you process JIBs or distribute revenue.” – Pat Johnson

An oil and gas accounting program “manages all the well information in one place and saves time.” – Diane Stallman

13. “To stay in tune with the changing accounting practices that affect the oil & gas industry” – Brenda Smith

14. “Oil & gas accounting is a complex “animal” and unique to the business. An accounting program will keep your business honest and organized so you can use what few tax breaks are left to us.” – Michael E. Flick

15. “Oil & Gas software is more regimented to the field.” – Diana Bennett

16. An oil and gas accounting program makes your business more accurate and efficient:

Invest in an oil and gas program for “speed, accuracy, efficiency.” – David Dorward

“It is an extremely efficient and effective way to maintain records for your company. It takes the hassle out of keeping records.” – TJ Hunter

“Efficiency and the ability to have information readily available to make decisions for your business.” – Tom Csapo

“To keep it all straight and accurate” – Peter Clute

“To make sure all revenue and expenses are distributed evenly to all” – Vicky Cross

“Because it is designed for the specific needs of the oil and gas industry and makes record keeping easier and more efficient.” – Rhonda Markum

17. An oil and gas accounting program allows you “to avoid dealing with the complexities of correctly calculating distributions for multi-owner programs; to keep accurate historical records.” – Louise Barton

18. “The benefits of owning an accounting program far outweigh the cost to purchase the program. You have so much more access to history, data and various other items.” – Cheryl Becker

As you can see, there are many reasons why it’s important to use an oil and gas accounting software program for your business. What’s your reason?

Step aside, Mr. Webster. I’m re-defining oil and gas accounting software

What is oil and gas accounting software?

I know, I know. This doesn’t seem like the most exciting post I’ve done yet, but before you switch over to your FaceBook account, think back to the last time someone asked you what oil and gas accounting software is?

Not easy to remember, right? Probably because your answer wasn’t so stellar. Today I’m taking over for Webster’s Dictionary and try to re-define (because it doesn’t exist for Mr. Webster) and perhaps even explain exactly what it is that we create at SherWare.

The obvious answer is that we create and support accounting software for the oil and gas industry. Clearly, in a broad sense that is how our software is intended to operate, but anyone in the industry knows how complex it can get, especially when you start throwing out words like upstream and downstream and terms like net and joint interest billing and AFEs.

In several posts over the next couple of weeks, we’ll also take a look at why our client’s think someone should use an oil and gas accounting program and what tips they have for picking the right software for your business.

So let me start at the beginning and break it down, piece by piece, what the new definition of oil and gas accounting software is, how oil and gas accounting software is designed to work and what type of businesses it is intended for.

First things first. The oil and gas industry is split into two main sectors: downstream and upstream.

Downstream refers to the oil and gas operations that take place after production all the way up to the point-of-purchase, whether it is at your local gas station or for fuel heating your home.

Upstream refers to the actual exploration and production of gas from surveying land to drilling and producing wells.

SherWare’s oil and gas accounting software is intended for those in the upstream sector who are beginning to drill and produce wells and need to track the production and revenue that’s brought in for that well and then distribute it to the investors.

The software then is used to help you track all of your wells, owners (investors) and their interests. As you begin to accumulate expenses and hopefully revenue from the wells, the software allows you to automatically allocate those expenses and incoming revenue between your investors according to their division orders, and then distribute that revenue or send invoices for the expenses, once you’ve entered your production receipts, invoices, bills, etc. into the software.

The old definition would look something like all the features I’ve been spouting above. The new definition of oil and gas accounting software is this: software to simplify how your company handles all aspects of exploring, producing, and distributing revenue and expenses for oil and gas wells so your business can continue to grow.

Now that we’ve got that redefined, let’s break down the software by what features are offered to help you get to that definition personally. To see a visual explanation of the differences between our three software products, check out our product flow chart.

General Ledger – This is typically the “brains” of the accounting side of the software where you can create and customize your chart of accounts. This is where accountants go crazy with checking double-sided entries and making sure debits and credits are all accounted for. If you use the Integrated Edition of the software, you won’t have to deal with this as it’s included in your QuickBooks software.

Accounts Receivable – Allows you to track customer information, invoicing, inventory and customer payments. This feature allows you to track your customer base and any sales made.

Accounts Payable – Any purchases your company makes from vendors as well as outstanding payments to those vendors will be tracked in the software’s Accounts Payable system. If the expense is well-related, it will then be distributed among the owners/investors of the well.

Revenue Distribution – Any income your wells generate will need to be distributed at some point to the investors/owners of the well. This part of the software allows you to track production receipts received for oil and gas and then automatically split that up among the investors according to their division orders for each specific well that has income.

Joint Interest Billing – In the oil and gas industry there are two ways to distribute your revenue and expenses among investors. One is to “Net” the expenses from the revenue and if there is a surplus, the owner is cut a check at the end of the month or distribution period, and if there is a deficit, they will receive an invoice for the amount of expenses not covered by the well’s revenue.

The other way is by joint interest billing. This is when an investor is cut a check for the entire amount of their share of revenue the well(s) received and then also sent a Joint Interest Billing Statement (JIB) which is an invoice for their entire share of the expense incurred so far.

Within our software, you can set up your wells and owners to be either, depending on your preference, and not all wells or owners have to be net or JIB owners.

Depending on your company’s operations, you may also be interested in other features such as:

Payroll – This module allows you to keep track of hours and salary and pay employees.

Land Management – Every oil and gas software program I’ve seen has a different take on what the Land Management part of the software should feature. Right now we have a simple approach to Land Management and use this feature to allow you to track your lease obligations and delay rental payments.

Authorization for Expenditure (AFEs) – Most wells won’t get very far without investors. Create an AFE to show your investors what you think the estimated costs will be for drilling or working over a particular well. Track the actual versus estimated costs within the software program to see if the well is going as projected.

House Gas – Track and bill usage for homeowners who are using your gas.

Direct Deposit – Pay your owners electronically by depositing their revenue distribution directly into their bank account.

Online Reporting – Give your owners password protected online access to all of their distribution statements, check stubs and 1099s on a website created specifically for your company.

Advanced Reporting – Design and create your own reports using the data from within your oil and gas accounting software.

MICR Check Printing – Purchase the MICR font and print checks directly on blank check stock.

That pretty much sums up the main features that your oil and gas accounting software can offer to help you reach the new definition of what the software is and how it can help your business reach its potential. As you can tell from the various features available, you can customize your software to handle whatever aspects of the industry that you need.

Think I left something out of the definition? Let me know.